Postcommunist Children’s Culture

 

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to submit articles to Miscellanea Posttotalitariana Wratislaviensia, a peer-reviewed scholarly journal published by the Interdisciplinary Research Center for Post-totalitarian Studies of the Institute of Slavic Studies (University of Wrocław, Poland) and indexed in Czasopisma Naukowe w Sieci (CNS), The Central European Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (CEJSH), and Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA, ProQuest). More specifically, we are seeking for essays and reviews for an issue on Post-communist Children’s Culture in Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe, which will be devoted to mapping new phenomena in children’s literature and media culture that have emerged during the transition from late communism to late capitalism. As Anikó Imre argues in Globalization and the Transformation of Media Cultures in the New Europe (2009), children from Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe are post-communist subjects for whom communism is an inherited memory, whose perspectives, values and skills differ from those of older generations, and whose subjectivities are developing in the shadow of adults’ anxieties about this divide. As sources of knowledge and social capital, children’s cultural products both reflect and attempt to resolve tensions caused by the formation of new individual and collective subjectivities. Exploration of regional, European and global affiliations shaping contemporary children’s culture in post-communist Europe offers a vital contribution to a broader inquiry into processes of cultural change and their significance for the formation of national identity in post-totalitarian countries. Contributions are welcomed from a range of fields, such as popular culture, new media, games, literature, education, and childhood.

 

Possible areas of investigation:

 

  • reflective and restorative nostalgia for communist children’s entertainment vs. technoeuphoria, neoliberalism, and the celebration of transnational mobility
  • childhood heritage
  • globalization vs. localization
  • children’s culture and Eurocentric values (e.g. the “Catching up with Europe” project, a pan-European democracy, the EuropaGO project)
  • children’s relations with interactive media, peer-to-peer technologies and participatory culture
  • edutainment vs. centralized, nationalized and literature-based education
  • children’s culture and citizenship education
  • nationalisms, ethnocentrism, homophobia, misogyny, racism, and xenophobia in children’s culture
  • relations between children’s and adult media cultures
  • children’s books markets
  • promotion of children’s literature and culture

Essay should be sent to Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak (justyna.deszcz-tryhubczak@uwr.edu.pl) and Mateusz Świetlicki (mateusz.swietlicki@uwr.edu.pl) by 10th April 2017. Submissions should be 5000-6000 words. We will aim to reply to authors by 20th April 2017, with the aim of arranging reviews and completing revisions for 15th June and publication by the end of 2017. Please keep in mind that the essays must satisfy the formal requirements provided below.

 

Respectfully,

Guest Editors

Dr. Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak (Institute of English Studies, University of Wroclaw)

and Dr. Mateusz Świetlicki (Institute of Slavic Studies, University of Wroclaw)

 

 

GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS

 

Editors reserve the right to reject submitted texts if they do not meet the publishing requirements.

All submitted articles undergo a double-blind review process prior to acceptance. The identities of the authors are concealed from the reviewers and vice versa. Reviewers shall issue their opinions on the acceptance or ineligibility of the reviewed text for publication taking into account, among others, such criteria as compliance with the journal’s profile; the innovative approach to the subject; the adequacy of the methodology used; the validity of the references used; and the contribution of the conclusions to the state of research.

 

In accordance with the current copyright law and related rights, authors of the texts submitted for publication are fully responsible for their authenticity and originality. The submitted text must be accompanied by a declaration of the author(s) stating that it has not been published anywhere (including the Internet) or sent to another journal for consideration. The declaration corresponds with the recommendations of the Ministry of Science and Higher Education of Poland counteracting the reprehensible practices of “ghostwriting” and “guest authorship”, which are unethical and reflect scientific misconduct. The declaration can be found on our website http://mpwr.wuwr.pl/page/dla- autorow-193

 

  • The submitted text must be accompanied by an abstract and title of the article (max. 150 words); five key words; a biographical note (affiliation; title or degree; position held; research interests; current work address and email – max. 80 words).

 

  • The name(s) and affiliation(s) of the author(s) should be listed in the upper left-hand corner of the first page:

Marianna Zacharska

Uniwersytet Jagielloński (Kraków, Polska)

 

  • Formatting and Style Guide:
  • a)  Standard printout: 30 lines per page; 60 characters per line (1800 characters with spaces per page); justified text; margins: top, bottom – 2,5; left – 3,5, right – 1,5
  • b)  font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
  • c)  title of the article – centered, font – 14 point size.
  • d)  spacing: 1,5 in the main text; single spaced in the footnotes.
  • e)  titles of literary works cited in the text for the first time should be accompanied by the original title (not in transliteration) and the date of publication in parentheses; titles of literary works should be italicized (do not use quotation marks).
  • f)  quotations should be given in the original language (not in transliteration); longer quotations (more than 40 words) should be set apart from the surrounding text, in block format, indented from the left margin, and single spaced; font: 10 point size.
  • g)  names appearing in the text for the first time should be given in full.

 

  • FOOTNOTES should be placed at the bottom of the page on which the reference appears. Use continuous footnote numbering.
  1. a) bibliographic description in the footnotes should be given in the original language; please follow the examples:
  2. Book:
  3. Smith, History, Warsaw 2009, p. 25.

Ibidem, s. 15.

  1. Smith, History, op. cit., p. 37.
  2. Excerpts from publications of the same author:
  3. Shamone, Rap Culture, [in:] eadem, The History of Music, New York 2012, pp. 67-98.

Ibidem, p. 75.

  1. Shamone, Rap Culture, op. cit., p. 90.
  2. Chapter in a collective work:
  3. Blake, Feminism and Masculinity, trans. by I. Kurz,
    [in:] Gender Studies, ed. A. Johnes et al. introduction by M. Sahara, London 2008, pp. 109-117.
  4. Journal article:
  5. Noovy, Jane Austen and Romanticisms „English Studies” 2006, no. 1, pp. 32-73.
  6. Online journal article:
  7. Adams, American History, „SSHA” 14 July 2013 [http://tssha.com/Society/69385/PrintView – accessed: 20.01.20013].

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY/REFERENCE LIST:

  • Reference list or bibliography should be included at the end of the text.
  • The word bibliography should be in bold and aligned to the left. Font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
  • List the sources in alphabetical order by the authors’ last names.
  • All sources must be justified and 1.5–spaced. Font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
  • Use: The Chicago Manual of Style

 

Book

One author

Pollan, Michael. 2006. The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. New York: Penguin.

Two or more authors

Ward, Geoffrey C., and Ken Burns. 2007. The War: An Intimate History, 1941–1945. New York: Knopf.

Editor, translator, or compiler instead of author

Lattimore, Richmond, trans. 1951. The Iliad of Homer. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Editor, translator, or compiler in addition to author

García Márquez, Gabriel. 1988. Love in the Time of Cholera. Translated by Edith Grossman. London: Cape.

Chapter or other part of a book

Kelly, John D. 2010. “Seeing Red: Mao Fetishism, Pax Americana, and the Moral Economy of War.” In Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, edited by John D. Kelly, Beatrice Jauregui, Sean T. Mitchell, and Jeremy Walton, 67–83. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Chapter of an edited volume originally published elsewhere (as in primary sources)

Cicero, Quintus Tullius. 1986. “Handbook on Canvassing for the Consulship.” In Rome: Late Republic and Principate, edited by Walter Emil Kaegi Jr. and Peter White. Vol. 2 of University of Chicago Readings in Western Civilization, edited by John Boyer and Julius Kirshner, 33–46. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Originally published in Evelyn S. Shuckburgh, trans., The Letters of Cicero, vol. 1 (London: George Bell & Sons, 1908).

Preface, foreword, introduction, or similar part of a book

Rieger, James. 1982. Introduction to Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, xi–xxxvii. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Book published electronically

Austen, Jane. 2007. Pride and Prejudice. New York: Penguin Classics. Kindle edition.

Kurland, Philip B., and Ralph Lerner, eds. 1987. The Founders’ Constitution. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. http://press-pubs.uchicago.edu/founders/.

 

Journal article

Article in a print journal

Weinstein, Joshua I. 2009. “The Market in Plato’s Republic.” Classical Philology 104:439–58.

Article in an online journal

Include a DOI (Digital Object Identifier) if the journal lists one. If no DOI is available, list a URL.

Kossinets, Gueorgi, and Duncan J. Watts. 2009. “Origins of Homophily in an Evolving Social Network.” American Journal of Sociology 115:405–50. Accessed February 28, 2010. doi:10.1086/599247.

Article in a newspaper or popular magazine

Mendelsohn, Daniel. 2010. “But Enough about Me.” New Yorker, January 25.

Stolberg, Sheryl Gay, and Robert Pear. 2010. “Wary Centrists Posing Challenge in Health Care Vote.” New York Times, February 27. Accessed February 28, 2010. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/us/politics/28health.html.

 

Book review

Kamp, David. 2006. “Deconstructing Dinner.” Review of The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals, by Michael Pollan. New York Times, April 23, Sunday Book Review. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/23/b

 

Thesis or dissertation

Choi, Mihwa. 2008. “Contesting Imaginaires in Death Rituals during the Northern Song Dynasty.” PhD diss., University of Chicago.

 

Paper presented at a meeting or conference

Adelman, Rachel. 2009. “ ‘Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On’: God’s Footstool in the Aramaic Targumim and Midrashic Tradition.” Paper presented at the annual meeting for the Society of Biblical Literature, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 21–24.

 

Website

Google. 2009. “Google Privacy Policy.” Last modified March 11. http://www.google.com/intl/en/privacypolicy.html.

McDonald’s Corporation. 2008. “McDonald’s Happy Meal Toy Safety Facts.” Accessed July 19. http://www.mcdonalds.com/corp/about/factsheets.html.

 

Blog entry or comment

Posner, Richard. 2010. “Double Exports in Five Years?” The Becker-Posner Blog, February 21. http://uchicagolaw.typepad.com/beckerposner/2010/02/double-exports-in-five-years-posner.html.

 

Item in a commercial database

Choi, Mihwa. 2008. “Contesting Imaginaires in Death Rituals during the Northern Song Dynasty.” PhD diss., University of Chicago. ProQuest (AAT 3300426).

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YA Literature and Theory of Mind

Dr. Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak participated in the YA Literature and Theory of Mind panel convened by prof. Lydia Kokkolę (Luleå University of Technology ) and prof. Alison Waller (University of  Roehampton) at the conference European Society for the Study of English, organized in Galway, in August 2016. During the panel she gave the presentation on  „Cognitive Lessons about Social Movements: Social Minds, Theory of Mind and Empathy in Radical Fantasy Fiction for Young Readers.”

Dr. Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak uczestniczyła w panelu  „YA Literature and Theory of Mind”, zorganizowan przez prof. Lydię Kokkolę (Luleå University of Technology ) i prof. Alison Waller (Uniwersytet w Roehampton) na międzynarodowej konferencji the European Society for the Study of English w Galway (sierpień 2016). Podczas panelu Dr. Deszcz-Tryhubczak wygłosiła referat „Cognitive Lessons about Social Movements: Social Minds, Theory of Mind and Empathy in Radical Fantasy Fiction for Young Readers”.

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„Duże sprawy w małych głowach”

Zachęcamy do zapoznania się i wsparcia tej inicjatywy.

https://www.facebook.com/duze.sprawy/

Pracownia uczestniczy w szerszym projekcie dotyczącym nauczania o niepełnosprawnościach i chorobach.

Zapraszamy do obejrzenia fimiku:

 

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Critiquing Constructions of Childhood and Youth in Anglophone Cinema with University Students

Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak participated in the Film Literacy Workshop: at in/between: cultures of connectivity, organized by Dr.  Ewa Ciszewska from  the School of Media and Audiovisual Culture, at the University of Lodz, during the international conference of the  European Network for Cinema and Media Studies (Potsdam, 28-30 July, 2016).  The title of the presentation was „‚The Ambiguous and Disturbing Content’  (an undergraduate student): Critiquing Constructions of Childhood and Youth in Anglophone Cinema with University Students”.

Justyna  Deszcz-Tryhubczak uczestniczyła w  Film Literacy Workshop: at in/between: cultures of connectivity, zorganizowanym przez dr Ewę Ciszewską z Katedry Mediów i Kultury Audiowizualnej na Wydziale Filologicznym Uniwersytetu Łódzkiego podczas konferencji European Network for Cinema and Media Studies  się  dniach 28-30 lipca  br. w Poczdamie. Dr Deszcz-Tryhubczak wygłosiła referat pt. „‚The Ambiguous and Disturbing Content’  (an undergraduate student): Critiquing Constructions of Childhood and Youth in Anglophone Cinema with University Students”.

 

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CFP: Encounters of the Playful Kind: Children’s Literature and Intergenerational Relationships

 

 

Encounters of the Playful Kind:

Children’s Literature and Intergenerational Relationships

 

Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak and Barbara Kalla (Eds.)

 

 

Submissions are invited for chapters on possible intersections between children’s literature and play as spaces of encounters between imaginary childhoods and adulthoods as well as between real children and adults. On the one hand, the collection will draw on aesthetic approaches to children’s literature to explore the concept of intergenerational play as informing texts thematically and stylistically. On the other hand, it will rely on methods developed within sociology of literature to discuss interage play as fostering extraliterary interactions between children and adults in the context of shared reading experiences. This volume will thus contribute to children’s literature studies, childhood studies, and play and culture studies.

 

Contributions are welcomed from a range of fields, such as literature, literacy and art education, popular culture, and games.

 

Possible areas of investigation:

 

  1. Literary representations of play shared between children and adults (e.g. family games, symbolic meanings of children’s play; intergenerational play as a device organizing the structure and poetics of a literary text; children’s play as inspiration of authors and illustrators; authors’ memories of childhood)

 

  1. Play as fostering reader relationships in informal and institutional contexts (e.g. child and adult readers as partners in home and school settings; meeting points between home literacies and formal reading instruction; intergenerational reading in cultural institutions; literary festivals; authors interacting with young readers outside the book; games developed out of books; children’s literature in the context of participatory culture)

 

  1. Metacritical and autoethnographic reflection on scholars’ play with child readers (e.g. the significance of play in researchers’ reading histories; professional reading vs. reading for pleasure; play with young readers as a research method)

 

An abstract of the proposal, maximum 300 words, with a brief CV of the author(s), maximum 40 words, should be submitted to Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak (justyna.deszcz-tryhubczak@uwr.edu.pl) and Barbara Kalla (barbara.kalla@uwr.edu.pl) by 31st October 2016.

We will aim to reply to authors by 30th November 2016.

 

Abstracts accepted by the contributors will be used to produce a publishing proposal to be submitted to an international publisher. Full manuscripts should be prepared by 31st January 2017 with the aim of completing revisions etc. for 30th June  2017 and publication by the end of 2017.

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Children’s Literature and Play Conference (Wrocław, 19-21 May, 2016)

W dniach 19-21 maja 2016 roku na Wydziale Filologicznym odbyła międzynarodowa interdyscyplinarna konferencja The Child and the Book, w tym roku poświęcona zagadnieniom gry i zabawy w literaturze dziecięcej. Jest to konferencja cykliczna, organizowana od 2004 roku w różnych krajach (Wielka Brytania, Belgia, Turcja, Stany Zjednoczone, Kanada, Norwegia, Włochy, Grecja, Portugalia). Tegoroczne, dwunaste już spotkanie odbywa się w Polsce z udziałem 130 badaczy literatury dziecięcej z Polski, Australii, USA, Kanady, Wielkiej Brytanii, Niemiec, Hiszpanii, Portugalii, Norwegii, Szwecji, Finlandii, Irlandii, Włoch, Izraela, Węgier, Chorwacji, Belgii, Ukrainy i Francji. Pracownię reprezentowali dr Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak (członek komitetu organizacyjnego), dr Agata Zarzycka, dr Mateusz Świetlicki oraz mgr Robert Gadowski.

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Learning to Include funded by an AEIF grant

The project Learning to Include, led by  Bartosz Wilimborek from Warsaw Centre for Socio-Educational Innovation and Training (https://www.wcies.edu.pl/component/k2/item/1041) has been awarded a grant from the Alumni Engagement Innovation Fund (AEIF) of the U.S. Department od State. The project is one of the 61 winning initiatives selected out of 829 AEIF proposals from 51 countries. The project is aimed at developing and promoting educational programmes concerning disabilities. The Center for Young People’s Literature and Culture, represented by Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak, is one of the project partners and will contribute methods based on applications of children’s literature as teaching materials. See https://alumni.state.gov/aeif-2016-winners

Projekt “Learning to Include”, w którym uczestniczy Pracownia Literatury oraz Kultury Dziecięcej i Młodzieżowej, reprezentowana przez Justynę Deszcz-Tryhubczak, został laureatem konkursu o granty Alumni Engagement Innovation Fund (AEIF) Departamentu Stanu USA, w kategorii Human Rights and Social Inclusion of Vulnerable Populations. Z 829 projektów z 51 krajów zgłoszonych w tym roku, wyłoniono 61 zwycięskich pomysłów. Projekt „Learning to Include”, kierowany przez Bartosza Wilimborka z Warszawskiego Centrum Innowacji Edukacyjno-Społecznych i Szkoleń (https://www.wcies.edu.pl/), dotyczy rozwijania i promocji różnorodnych metod edukacji szkolnej dotyczącej niepełnosprawności. Pracownia zajmie się rozwijaniem metod wykorzystujących literaturę dziecięcą. Szczegóły: https://alumni.state.gov/aeif-2016-winners

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